Bloodhound Race for the Line and Bluetooth

1000mph in a car No, that’s not a typo. One thousand miles per hour (mph). In a car. Gulp! Bloodhound SSC is a British, supersonic land vehicle being built for the purpose of achieving a new land speed world record. The current world record is held by Wing Commander Andy Green, a British Royal Air Force pilot, who achieved a speed of 760 mph in 1997. The goal of the Bloodhound SSC project is to achieve or exceed 1000 mph. As you’d imagine, a project like this, will encounter and need to solve, all... Continue Reading

The BBC Robot Wars micro:bit Coding Challenge

microbit-controller

Robot Wars is a BBC TV show featuring robots...and war.Robot Wars works like this. Contestants, usually teams of two or more, build awe-inspiring, battling robots. They bring them on the show and fight other contestants’ robots in a purpose-built arena—all the time keeping an eye open for the fearsome and deadly house robots. You win a bout by immobilsing (e.g. by completely destroying) all the other robots or, if no clear winner emerges when time runs out, by judges’ decision. The judges assess... Continue Reading

SAM Labs Makes Developer Education Fun

SAM-Make-Kit

SAM Labs is a London-based startup created by a team of engineers from Imperial College London and designers from the Royal College of Art. SAM’s mission is to give everyone the skills to shape the Internet of Things (IoT) with fun, and functional, tools. The award-winning SAM programmable blocks are some of the most innovative educational toys for 7+ year olds to learn coding. It allows people to learn coding like cooking dinner—by adding one ingredient at a time to create something wonderful and... Continue Reading

Bluetooth and the BBC micro:bit: Introducing Young People to an Unthinkably Connected World

Bluetooth-menu

Part 2: Designing the Profile for the micro:bitPart 2 of my BBC micro:bit series takes a much closer look at its Bluetooth capabilities and describes the way in which the micro:bit’s default Bluetooth profile was designed. Check out part 1, where I described the background to the micro:bit, it’s hardware features and architecture.Designing the micro:bit Bluetooth profileMy first BBC micro:bit meeting was in the spring of 2014 and involved the BBC plus micro:bit partners Lancaster University, ARM... Continue Reading

BBC micro:bit - The Woolley Factor

BBC micro:bit - The Woolley Factor

A lot of work has been done on the BBC micro:bit and we've produced a lot of documentation along the way. This growing collection of videos and code will give you further understanding about this exciting project.Most of the videos feature an Android application I wrote to enable the testing and demonstration of the many Bluetooth capabilities for the BBC micro:bit.In order to fully use the application and enjoy your micro:bit's Bluetooth capabilities, you need a hex file which contains the full... Continue Reading

BBC micro:bit Inspires Generation to Get Coding

Architecture

Bluetooth and the micro:bitThe BBC micro:bit is a small, programmable device equipped with Bluetooth technology which was designed by the BBC and a team of partners to be used in education. One million micro:bits were recently given to 11- and 12-year old British school children. The Bluetooth SIG is one of the partner organisations involved in the project, and it being a UK-based initiative, I was fortunate to be the SIG’s representative on the micro:bit team.In this series of articles, I’ll introduce... Continue Reading

BBC micro:bit—A Groundbreaking Project Putting Bluetooth Technology in the Hands of Next Generation of IoT Developers

1-FRONT-GREEN

Today marks another big milestone for Bluetooth Smart technology. Not only is it already established as a defining technology for the Internet of Things but also something just as big – a hugely prolific influence to the next generation of coders.As part of its 2015 Make it Digital initiative, the BBC today unveiled the BBC micro:bit – a pocket-sized, programmable computer that allows children get creative with technology. Up to 1 million micro:bits will be given to every 11 or 12 year old child... Continue Reading